December 10, 2019

Jack Spradlin: Lefty Pitcher Recalls His Professional Baseball Journey

December 1, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Jack Spradlin was a left-handed pitcher who played at just about every possible level of professional baseball except for the big leagues. By no means was that a failure, as he had a long and interesting career playing the game that he loves. On the radar of major league teams since high school, Spradlin was a […]

THE 1941 MEXICAN LEAGUE SEASON

November 17, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Before the 1941 season began, the Mexican League consolidated, going from 7 teams down to only 6 teams. Although the number of Negro Leaguers decreased from 67 to 58, in percentage terms they increased from around 33% to 40% of the total player population. But this understates their impact, as in terms of At Bats, […]

No Way to Honor #42’s Memory

November 14, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

There are 626 retired men and their families who played Major League Baseball who are being denied pensions by both the league and the union representing the current players, the Major League Baseball Players’ Association (MLBPA), because of an error the union committed 39 years ago. In order to avert a threatened 1980 walkout by […]

Dale Scott: The Umpire Experience

November 2, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Umpires are truly overlooked for their contributions to baseball. Their ability to arbitrate games and interpret rules is done at an amazingly high success rate. Even their humanity during times when they make mistakes, or at a minimum, decisions that not all agree with, can bring an exciting and unexpected element to the game. One […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1930 Negro National League

October 25, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

Check out the latest addition to the database, the 1930 Negro National League, based on the work of Larry Lester, Wayne Stivers, and the Negro League Researchers and Authors Group. Also part of this addition are games between NNL and eastern teams, especially the Homestead Grays, which gives a much fuller picture of the Grays’ […]

On Becoming National League Champions in 2019

October 17, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

Victor Robles squeezes the ball into his glove as the man next to me shouts, “It’s an out, baby, it’s an out,” and the stadium erupts into pure animal joy. As the fireworks erupt and the fans explode, the center field gate swings open and a makeshift stage begins to move toward the infield as […]

Is 2019 the Post Season of the Pitcher?

October 13, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Whoever said it, the old mantra that pitching wins the World Series has an early lead in 2019, even in the modern game where the home run is the attention grabber, the defining moment that lifts everyone from their seats to track the flight of the ball as it heads toward the light standard. But […]

The Mexican Leagues are Here!

October 11, 2019 by · 2 Comments 

From its inception in 1924, thru the 1939 season, the Mexican League was basically a league of native Mexican semi-pro players, playing for their local teams. There were a few foreign imports that played in the league during those seasons, most notably Martin Dihigo, who left the New York Cubans after the 1936 season to […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1929 NNL

October 8, 2019 by · 2 Comments 

This week we’ve added the 1929 Negro National League to the database, where it joins the 1929 American Negro League (the east coast league) for a complete view of the black majors in that year. This update also includes the 1923 Harrisburg Giants and 1924–1925 Homestead Grays, both courtesy of Scott Simkus, along with new […]

Boston Red Sox 2019: What Went Right

October 5, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Thanks to social media and endless emails I receive from the Boston Globe, NESN, WEEI, and The Athletic Daily it’s clear everyone is still bewildered by what happened to a team that won a franchise-best 108 games last year, then steamrolled through the postseason only to follow it up with a third-place finish that found […]

The Chicago Black Sox: What Might Have Been

September 29, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

The 1919 Chicago White Sox (aka Black Sox) were the one of the most famous and infamous teams of all time. After going 88-52 in the regular season, they rolled into the World Series to face off against the Cincinnati Reds as heavy favorites, but surprisingly looked clumsy and disinterested in the field; ultimately losing […]

Mookie Betts: Why the Boston Red Sox May Be About to Make a Big Mistake

September 21, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

If recent reports are to be believed, the Boston Red Sox may be about to make a major mistake this upcoming offseason. At least it will be if they decide to part ways with their star right fielder, Mookie Betts. The Sox, coming off a dominant 108-win and World Series-winning 2018 season, belly flopped into 2019 with a […]

Ballpark

September 17, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

Ballpark, the excellent book on baseball architecture by Paul Goldberger, is a paean to those unique and very public edifices in which “America’s Pastime” is played. Goldberger’s history and physical description of so many of them is very much like barnstorming the country to see them, so aptly and lovingly described are they in his […]

Notes From the Davey Martinez Fan Club

September 15, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Davey Martinez, current manager of the Washington Nationals, is a case study in why catchers make such good managers. Be it Bruce Bochy, Kevin Cash, Joe Girardi or Mike Matheny, their years of sitting behind the plate and working with a pitching staff on an every day basis provided key insights into how to manage […]

Jamie Lavarnway- Ryan Lavarnway’s Partner in His Baseball Journey

September 14, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

The life of a professional baseball player is a continuous roller coaster of ups and downs. Great successes, bitter disappointments, nomadic living and uncertain futures are all part of the experience. These are not just enjoyed and anguished over by the player; those closest to them are right next to them in the passenger seat […]

Author Charles Leerhsen and the Dramatic Way He Changed the Legacy of Baseball Legend Ty Cobb

September 1, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

Nearly a century after playing his final big-league game, outfielder Ty Cobb is still considered among the best players to ever set foot on a diamond. He also has one of the worst reputations, as a caustic and virulent racist, who succeeded despite erratic behavior and hatred. However, as author Charles Leerhsen discovered when writing his groundbreaking […]

New Book Released: THE ARCHIVES OF THE BASEBALL HISTORIAN, VOLUME II

August 31, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

More interviews with players, writers and other figures throughout baseball history  I have released my new book, which is another collection of interviews with baseball figures (former and current players, journalists, the Baseball Hall of Fame President, and more!) from the 1940s to the present. It is available in the following formats: PAPERBACK- https://www.amazon.com/dp/1081782862 KINDLE- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VDZWSQF I […]

From Pizza Delivery to the Big Leagues: Jim Rushford and His Amazing Journey Through Baseball

August 24, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Research shows that only about 0.5 percent of high school seniors who play baseball will get drafted by a baseball team; and less than 11 percent of varsity baseball-playing college seniors will get the call. Of those few that become a draft pick, less than one in five will eventually play in the majors. These numbers all make […]

The Last At-Bat of Legendary Baseball Hitters

August 17, 2019 by · 2 Comments 

Major League Baseball is defined by its legends; players who are still remembered decades after their last appearance in a game and their ultimate deaths. Despite the amazing feats some of these players accomplished, when the bell finally rang to signal the end of their careers, their swan songs were lackluster by comparison. In particular, […]

Nick Hagadone: Baseball, Coffee and Hard Work

August 4, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

It takes a great deal of confidence for a professional baseball player to succeed. There are few things that can better help tap into potential. Throughout his career, pitcher Nick Hagadone bet on himself and his talent and has seen it pay off again and again. Growing up in the suburbs of Seattle, Hagadone loved […]

Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood

August 4, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Like a lot of movie fans, I’m very excited about the forthcoming Mister Rogers biopic, It’s a Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, starring Academy Award-winner Tom Hanks, which opens on November 22. There is another Mister Rogers out there who is the complete antithesis of the legendary children’s television show host. Steve Rogers was a […]

Trevor Bauer, Sam McDowell, and A Rod’s Birthday Cake

August 1, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

So, in a fit of anger or frustration or both, Trevor Bauer heaved the baseball over the center field fence. So, what? Sure Bauer should have just handed the ball to his manager, Terry Francona, but it’s not as if he refused to give it to him, and gave him the finger instead. When someone […]

How Jeter Can Be Like Teddy Ballgame

July 30, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

On July 25, 1966, Ted Williams was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. On July 26, 2020, it’s a near certainty that former New York Yankees shortstop and current Miami Marlins chief executive officer and part owner Derek Jeter will join him. What’s not nearly as clear is the kind of induction speech Jeter, […]

Like Complete Games, Respect for Elders Is a Thing of the Past

July 24, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Jim Golden, 83, is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher who resides in Topeka, In 69 career games, including 20 starts, Golden won nine games, two of which were shutouts, and saved one other. In 208 total innings, he threw five complete games. These days, fans are fortunate if they see a starter go […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1931 NNL + 1922 Eastern Independent Teams

July 21, 2019 by · 2 Comments 

We’re happy to announce the latest update to the Seamheads Negro Leagues DB, one of the largest updates we’ve ever made. It includes: 1) The 1931 Negro National League (plus inter-regional games between NNL and eastern independent teams). This was the last year of the original NNL. Its death knell sounded when the Kansas City […]

Carl Nichols: Former Catcher Still Continuing His Baseball Dreams

July 20, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

The Baltimore Orioles were one of the most dominant teams in baseball, winning their division five times and playing in three World Series (winning one of them). A good portion of their success was owed to their dogged pursuit of top-flight talent through the major league draft. One player they tabbed to join their dynastic […]

Harry Frazee, William Howard Taft, and the Lasker Plan

July 15, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

Most baseball fans know that Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis became Major League Baseball’s first commissioner in 1920.  But if Boston Red Sox owner Harry Frazee had gotten his way, former President William Howard Taft would have gotten the job two years earlier.

Chicago National League Ball Club of 1876 Honored On Monument

July 3, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

On May 18, 2019, a monument dedication was held at Little Cubs Field in Freeport, Illinois. The black granite memorial honors the Chicago National League Ball Club of 1876 known as the Chicago White Stockings and today’s Chicago Cubs. The public was invited and joining the event were family members of the catcher of the […]

Vinnie Pestano: Former Side-Arm Reliever Reflects on Successful Major League Career

June 30, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Right-handed pitcher Vinnie Pestano was on a sure-fire major league trajectory in college when a severe injury cast everything into doubt. Fortunately, a team recognized his inherent talent and took a chance on his recovery, and he bounced back to have a solid six-year career in the big leagues. A side-armer, Pestano grew rapidly as […]

Mariano Rivera Hits an Inside-the-Park Home Run: The Baseball Historian’s Notes for June 23, 2019

June 23, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

The 2019 baseball season is in full swing. Along with a full slate of exciting games, comes regular remembrances of players, teams and occurrences from the past. This is the next edition of the Baseball Historian’s Notes. -There is an exciting new baseball museum exhibit at the Detroit Historical Museum. “Detroit Stars & The Negro Leagues” opened […]

The Other Wright Brothers: George, Harry and the Team that Made Baseball Famous

June 14, 2019 by · 2 Comments 

It’s almost too much for the senses to absorb: two precedent-setting Hall of Famers and their team that played coast to coast, beat everyone and sold the country on professional baseball. George Wright was the Babe Ruth of his day in the 1860s and ’70s, and he went on to become arguably the most versatile […]

Todd Greene: Catching Up with the Slugging Backstop

June 9, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Certain skill sets can get a baseball player noticed a lot more quickly than others. One of those is power, as that’s something that can’t be taught. One of the best slugging prospects in the last half-century was Todd Greene, who had the benefit of also being a catcher, which made his dangerous bat all the […]

Bill Buckner: Redefining a Remarkable Career

May 29, 2019 by · 1 Comment 

After battling dementia, baseball stalwart Bill Buckner passed away this past weekend at the age of 69. Having spent parts of 22 seasons in the major leagues, he will forever be one of the most recognizable names in the game. While many immediately think of him because of one misplayed ball made on the biggest […]

Emmy-Nominated Author Granville Wyche Burgess Discusses His New Book The Last At-Bat of Shoeless Joe

May 23, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

Emmy-Nominated Author Granville Wyche Burgess has written a new historical fiction book, titled The Last At-Bat of Shoeless Joe (Chickadee Prince Books, May 1, 2019). Coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the Black Sox scandal, The Last At Bat of Shoeless Joe re-imagines the final days of disgraced baseball legend Joe Jackson and his relationship with a young […]

Selling Ripe Bananas and Making Banana Bread

May 23, 2019 by · Leave a Comment 

My 93-year old mother-in-law, bless her dear, departed soul, once opined that she was too old to buy a green banana. Ted Lerner, who was until recently the principal owner of the Washington Nationals is now 93, and many of his decisions in recent years regarding the Nationals have been made out of his desire […]

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