November 18, 2018

Vance Law Discusses His Life In Baseball

November 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Vance Law had access to big league baseball that most kids can only dream about. His father Vern had a 16-year major league career as a star pitcher. Not surprisingly, Vance went into the family business and his in the midst of a 40-year (and still going) baseball career. Vance has an 11-year career (1980-1991) playing in the […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1948 NAL & NNL

October 17, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The latest addition to the Seamheads Negro Leagues DB encompasses the 1948 Negro American League, Negro National League, and World Series. This was the last season for the NNL, which ceased operations in 1949 as the Homestead Grays and Black Yankees dropped out, and the four remaining teams joined the Negro American League. It was […]

Lenny DiNardo: Memorable Boston Red Sox Pitcher Recalls His Career

October 8, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Making it to the major leagues is tough enough on its own. Breaking through to baseball’s highest level and becoming part of a historically memorable team is even rarer. Left-handed pitcher Lenny DiNardo had a 94-game big league career, but he stretched it out over the course of six seasons. He also played a pivotal role on […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1901 Cuban League

September 25, 2018 by · 1 Comment 

Our newest addition to the DB is the 1901 Cuban League. This is another product of our collaboration with Negroleagueshistory.com, based on research in 1899-1901 Cuban sports newspapers from the collections of Jay Caldwell and Ryan Christoff. The 1901 season was the second year of integrated pro baseball in Cuba. After San Francisco’s shock pennant […]

Help Select a Negro Leagues Centennial Team!

September 16, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

From my friend Jay Caldwell at NegroLeaguesHistory.com: The Centennial of the founding of the Negro National League will be upon us before you know it—February 13, 2020. Among the ways we are planning to commemorate this occasion is by honoring a Negro Leagues Centennial Team with a BOBBLEHEAD of each player. You can help us. […]

Greg Litton: Baseball’s Mr. Versatile

September 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

When discussing baseball prospects, versatility is not a skill that rises to the top. People want to know how fast someone can throw or how much powers they have more than whether they can do a lot of little things. However, this ability has served some players well and allowed them to have productive careers in […]

From the Archives: “The Mysterious Floating Sensation”

August 12, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The following was originally posted on October 6, 2008 and an abridged version appears in Baseball’s Untold History: The Wild Side published by Summer Game Books in 2017. Did he or didn’t he? That’s the question. Eddie Cicotte is widely recognized as the inventor of the knuckleball, earning his nickname “Knuckles” around 1908, his first […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1900 Cuban League

July 30, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

This week, as part of our collaboration with Jay Caldwell and Negroleagueshistory.com, we present statistics gleaned from box scores printed in Cuban baseball newspapers (supplied both by Jay and by Ryan Christoff) for the historic 1900 Cuban baseball season. This includes: 1) The Cuban X-Giants’ tour in Cuba in the spring of 1900, during which […]

Baseball Pioneers: True Stories of Guts and Glory as Told by Pioneering Men and Women of the Game- A Review

July 23, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Baseball history hounds can never satiate their appetite for digging in deep and uncovering myriad layers of the game that fascinates them much like an Indiana Jones treasure hunt. The stories, the perspectives and the connections are endless… Endlessly fascinating. Another volume that has weighed in with some additional work is The Sweet Spot Presents […]

Principal Park: Despite City’s Size, Ballpark Has Big Impact

June 30, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Minor league baseball a Des Moines, Iowa, staple at same location since 1947 Submitted by Steve Dunn Located at the confluence of the Des Moines and Raccoon rivers in Des Moines, Iowa, Principal Park and its two predecessors have hosted professional baseball since Friday, June 20, 1947. One of the more unique games in minor […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1947 NNL & NAL

June 17, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

We’re pleased to announce the addition of the 1947 Negro leagues to the DB. In that year history continued to bear down on the NNL & NAL. Josh Gibson tragically died in January. Jackie Robinson debuted for the Dodgers in April, and by mid-season other big league clubs were sniffing around the Negro leagues for […]

Former Pitcher Russ Ortiz Recalls His Baseball Career

June 15, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Pitching is one of the most difficult endeavors in baseball. It was particularly daunting in the early 2000s, as offenses were operating at high-octane levels. That makes the career of Russ Ortiz all the more impressive, as the right-hander won 99 games in one six-year stretch on his way to a wildly successful 12-year major […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1938 Negro American League

June 4, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

We’ve added the 1938 Negro American League to the database, meaning that we now have every major Negro league from 1933 through 1946—with 1947 coming soon. In 1938 the NAL’s center of gravity moved decisively to the South. The Cincinnati Tigers, St. Louis Stars, and Detroit Stars all folded—while two new clubs in the South […]

Jacob deGrom’s Record-Pace Bad Luck

May 31, 2018 by · 2 Comments 

Any Mets fan can tell you what a brutal season Jacob deGrom has had, though it might appear quite unlikely to the outsider. Look at his stats, after all: a 4-0 record, 1.52 ERA, 85 strikeouts and just 47 hits in 65 1/3 innings. That should put him on a pace to contend for the […]

Bill Sampen: Pitcher Recalls Successful Career with Montreal Expos

May 28, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Although major league baseball has been gone from Montreal for over a decade now, the legacy of the game remains vibrant there. Fans have to rely on memories instead of being able to root for a team able to make new ones. Fortunately, there are ample fond recollections and players from  the past. Among them […]

Long-Term Battery Combinations

April 24, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Submitted by Howard Johnson The most comforting words that can be heard by any hard-core fan of professional baseball is the annual mid-winter pronouncement that “Pitchers and catchers will report on ….” Given those are the two positions involved on every pitch of every game, each performs within the confines of a space rigorously defined […]

Staking a Claim To Failure

April 9, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Any baseball person concedes that you can’t tell much from the first ten days of the season. You do spot some things, like the starting lineups and pitching rotations, a few notable debuts, some happy returns, but nothing terribly conclusive. Every player is “on a pace” to do something miraculously spectacular or spectacularly horrible, and […]

Chance Sisco’s Violation of One of Baseball’s Dumbest (Unwritten) Rules

April 2, 2018 by · 4 Comments 

The 2018 major league baseball season is not even a week old and there is already a strong candidate for the dumbest story of the year. With his team trailing 7-0 in the ninth inning on April 1st, Baltimore Orioles’ rookie catcher Chance Sisco laid down a bunt for a single against a shift employed by the […]

The Party No One Came To

March 15, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Tom Boswell had a fascinating column in this morning’s Washington Post examining whether Bryce Harper will get his $400 million, 10-year contract that has been the talk of baseball punditry for the past few years. The gist of it is that the current parameters of MLB contracts are exerting a downward pressure on salaries. Ask […]

Jackie Robinson: Revisiting an Interview With a Baseball and Civil Rights Legend

March 2, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The age of the internet is a blessing in that it allows for the preservation of so many primary sources—the collection of video, audio and written materials from our past. This is particularly important to baseball history, where there is so much to keep track of. On April 14, 1957, legendary player and civil rights […]

History of a St. Louis Baseball Franchise: The St. Louis Stars

February 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

St. Louis Stars The St. Louis Stars were born when Richard William Kent, Sam Sheppard, Dr. J. W. “George” McClelland and Dr. G. B. Keys purchased the NNL St. Louis Giants franchise after the 1921 season. Dick Kent was a very successful businessman, who went from being a shoe shine boy to a real estate […]

St. Louis’ Forgotten Champions

February 23, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

On Sunday afternoon, October 7, 1928, at Sportsman’s Park, the St. Louis Cardinals were about to play the New York Yankees in the 3rd game of the 1928 World Series, finding themselves already down 2 games to none. This was the “Murderers Row” Yankees, with Ruth, Gehrig, Lazzeri, Combs, Hoyt, Pennock, etc. They played in […]

1928 Negro National League Season Review – It’s in the Stars

February 16, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

For both Black History Month and the 90th Anniversary of the 1928 Negro National League season, below is a recap of the 1928 NNL pennant race. The Stars’ Wonderful First Half The 1928 NNL consisted of the following teams (in order of their 1927 records): Chicago American Giants (won 1st half, playoffs and World Series […]

Identifying the Largest Gaps Between Teams and Their Farm Systems

February 13, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

In the process of conducting research for the “Minors vs. Majors” chapter for my upcoming book “Hardball Retroactive,” I tabulated the overall won-loss records among the minor league affiliates for every Major League franchise since 1963. Further investigation allowed me to ascertain the largest gaps between MLB teams and their farm systems, divided into two […]

Could Amazon.com Nationals Park Be a “Thing?”

February 9, 2018 by · 2 Comments 

Naming rights are a very boring topic in the vast universe of what falls under the constellation known as “baseball.” Who really cares what you call the stadium as long as baseball is played there, unless you care about the old place names like Fenway Park and player names like Smoky Joe Wood and Dizzy […]

Negro Leagues DB Update: 1946 NNL & NAL

January 29, 2018 by · 2 Comments 

In 1946 the Negro leagues began to face the inevitable. The Brooklyn Dodgers finally broke Organized Baseball’s 60-year-old color line, signing several black players for their minor league system—including the best player in the 1945 Negro American League, the Monarchs’ shortstop Jackie Robinson, and arguably the best player in the 1945 Negro National League, the […]

Winter Leagues and Serie del Caribe updates

January 25, 2018 by · 1 Comment 

The latest on the Winter Leagues’ final series and Serie del Caribe 2018 are at the link below: http://www.sabrhornsby.org/2017/08/serie-del-caribe-2018/ I will be updating this link daily from now (Jan. 25) through the Serie del Caribe finals on February 8.  You can stay tuned by accessing the link (it’ll continue to be the same URL) above. […]

From the Archives: Gone Fishin’—The Sobering Case of “Shufflin’ Phil” Douglas

January 13, 2018 by · 5 Comments 

The following was originally published on the site on June 23, 2009. When “Shufflin’ Phil”1 Douglas arrived on the baseball scene in 1910 at the tender age of 20 he brought with him size and a fastball impressive enough to draw comparisons to Walter Johnson’s. Douglas, a product of Cedartown, Georgia, was a big man, […]

All Quiet Along the Potomac??

January 6, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The Potomac River is laced with ice near Nationals Park, but it is likely that life abounds beneath the serene white exterior that catches the afternoon sun from the south.  Yes, the water is moving despite the ice and things are heating up hot stove wise. There was the brief flurry of rumors that had […]

The Epic Pitching Duel That Changed the Future of Two Franchises

December 23, 2017 by · 1 Comment 

October 7, 2011 and the melting pot that is South Philadelphia is stirring. From the Parisian redesign of Rittenhouse Square to the William Penn statue at Broad and Market; from South Street to the Mexican and Asian influences of Washington Avenue; from the African-American neighborhood of Point Breeze to the hipsters’ hangout in Northern Liberties, […]

From the Archives: Punch Drunk—The Art Shires Story

December 17, 2017 by · 8 Comments 

The following was originally published on this site on May 18, 2009. Former major league first baseman Art Shires was many things; dapper, over-dressed, well-spoken, loud-mouthed, confident, cocky, entertaining, clownish; a hard drinker and a harder fighter. But was he also a murderer? A Dallas District Attorney thought so and charged him with that crime […]

Winter Leagues Update – Nov. 26

November 26, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Play continues south of the border as the Latin American winter leagues enter their final month of “regular season” action.  Here’s the latest: MEXICO – first-half play in the LMP (Liga Mexicana del Pacifico) concluded on Sunday, November 19.  First-half results were: Naranjeros de Hermosillo were awarded first place, and the eight points that go […]

From the Archives: Bob Lemon and the Hall of Fame

November 18, 2017 by · 3 Comments 

(Editor’s Note: The following was first published on this site on January 21, 2008.) A couple days ago Dr. Michael Hoban posted an article about strange Hall of Fame voting in which he wondered why Bob Lemon was suddenly regarded as a better pitcher than Allie Reynolds in 1972 after Reynolds received more votes in […]

From the Archives: Harry Lunte—The Man Who Tried to Replace Ray Chapman

November 11, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

On August 16, 1920 the Cleveland Indians prepared to take the field against the New York Yankees to start a crucial three-game series at Yankee Stadium that pitted the first-place Indians against the third-place Yankees. Cleveland was a mere four percentage points ahead of the Chicago White Sox in the standings; New York stood within […]

From the Archives: Touring the Bases with…Jim Bouton

October 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

“You see, you spend a good piece of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time.” Former major league pitcher Jim Bouton ended his controversial book Ball Four with those lines in 1969 and the nation has been in his grip […]

Next Page »