July 25, 2017

The Baseball Historian’s Notes for August 5, 2013: A-Rod Lacks the Good Will to Help Himself

August 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

News is expected today announcing the fate of maligned New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez. For his role in the Biogenesis performance enhancer scandal, he is expected to face anything from a lengthy suspension to being banned from the game. He has reportedly vowed to fight to the end, and accept no punishment despite […]

Banzai Babe Ruth: A Review

May 4, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

No matter how popular the NFL or NBA becomes, baseball still holds the title of America’s pastime.  For over a century it has been seen as a way to connect Americans with fellow countrymen and those from abroad, but is that a true representation?  Baseball has also served as a backdrop to larger diplomatic and […]

Big Trouble at The Lambs for John McGraw: Part I

December 11, 2011 by · 2 Comments 

John McGraw’s legacy is that of a fiery, rough and tumble sort, whose pugnacious nature on the baseball diamond was matched only by how he acted off the field. He could cuss and fight with the best of them, and scrapped his way to a Hall of Fame career in baseball, first as a player […]

You Can Bank on It

July 28, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

In 1967, Louis Armstrong recorded “What a Wonderful World.” Do you think Armstrong naturally believed that about everything? Most likely not, but he made a decision to view life with optimism. While Armstrong dazzled the jazz circuit, Ernie Banks shared a similar view on the baseball diamond. “Let’s play two,” Banks said. A combination of […]

More Than Just a Game

July 19, 2011 by · 6 Comments 

“Be not afraid of greatness: some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.”—William Shakespeare (Act II, Scene V of Twelfth Night) And some seize greatness at the most opportune time, like 10-year-old Alex Orr, who etched a memory on a small town in Southwest Washington state that won’t soon […]

Jorge Cordova: The Mentor

July 15, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Jorge Cordova was born to coach. You can tell that after spending a only few minutes with the man, or watching him counsel young players on the field. He combines his vast knowledge of the game with one of the friendliest personalities I have ever come across. It is hard to imagine that Jorge would […]

Under the Baseball Big Top

December 16, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

Quick, look over there. You better not blink because you just might miss the best play you will ever see. For better than 40 years, that’s what folks came to expect when teams like the Indianapolis Clowns came to town. Think of the Harlem Globetrotters in their heyday. The Clowns might pull off some hijinks […]

The Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic: Game Seven

November 13, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

In part one of my Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic series, I featured Game One of the 1988 World Series between the Oakland A’s and Los Angeles Dodgers, won by the latter on Kirk Gibson’s walk-off two-run homer off Dennis Eckersley, ironic because it was Eck who coined the phrase “walk-off piece.” Part two featured an […]

The Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic: Game Six

November 11, 2010 by · 4 Comments 

In part one of my Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic series, I featured Game One of the 1988 World Series between the Oakland A’s and Los Angeles Dodgers, won by the latter on Kirk Gibson’s walk-off two-run homer off Dennis Eckersley, ironic because it was Eck who coined the phrase “walk-off piece.” Part two featured an […]

The Famous Names of Not So Famous Players

August 27, 2010 by · 12 Comments 

Through the years a number of baseball players have became so well known that their fame transcended the game. Everyone knew who Babe Ruth, Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle were, even people who were not baseball fans. Then you have the players whose names attracted attention for other, more unfortunate reasons. Johnny Grubb, John Wockenfuss, […]

Muoio In Familiar Territory

May 9, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Steve Muoio may be over 900 miles from home, but the Webster resident finds himself in familiar territory. His Georgia College and State University Bobcats claimed first place and the number one seed in the upcoming Peach-Belt Conference tournament.  Success on the baseball diamond is something the Webster-Thomas graduate has known for much of his […]

Jackie Jensen: The Golden Boy

March 13, 2010 by · 3 Comments 

There wasn’t much Jackie Jensen COULDN’T do. He hit the longest home run in the history of Cal-Berkeley baseball–over 525 feet. In his first college football game, he ran back a punt 56 yards for a touchdown while breaking numerous tackles. He could shoot a basketball superbly, out-jump his college’s high jumpers, and even beat […]

The Battle For George Sisler’s Soul

August 5, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

In 1910, 17-year-old phenom George Sisler signed a contract with Akron of the Ohio-Pennsylvania League between his junior and senior years of high school.  Because he was a minor and had failed to garner his parents’ consent, Sisler and his father Cassius requested that the contract be declared invalid.  Sisler then enrolled at the University […]