September 23, 2017

From the Eyes of a Patriots Fan

August 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

It was a picture perfect night for baseball on Friday (August 16th).  While I realize that statement this is cliché’, it is apropos that evening at TD Ballpark, home of our Somerset Patriots of Bridgewater, NJ.  The park bustled with activity, from a dance performance given by a troupe of young entertainers, to the obligatory […]

The Powerful Pachyderms

January 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Hey baseball fans! Here’s the next blog about one of the greatest rosters in baseball history: Have you ever heard of the great manager Connie Mack? In case you haven’t, Mack managed the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 to 1950! During that span, he led the A’s to nine AL pennants and five World Series victories. Mack has […]

A Unique Walk-Off

June 18, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

I attended a SABR meeting of the Connie Mack Chapter in June of this year.  It was held at Waterfront Park in Trenton, New Jersey.  This is home to the Trenton Thunder, the ‘AA’ affiliate for the New York Yankees.  That day one of the presentations was about players that had hit over twenty triples […]

A Grooved Pitch—Hall of Famer vs. Three Game Cup of Coffee Youngster

June 10, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

On Sunday, May 26, 1912, the sixth place American Association Milwaukee Brewers opened a series against the second place Minneapolis Millers, facing future Hall of Fame member Rube Waddell. The eccentric Waddell is known to most baseball fans. Although on the downside of his career, he was still a pitcher to be reckoned with. During […]

El Juego De Beisbol Lo Cambio Lena Blackburne (Lena Blackburne Changed The Game of Baseball)

January 18, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Russell “Lena” Blackburne fue un jugador de cuadro que actuó ocho años en el período 1910-1927 para los Medias Blancas de Chicago, los Rojos de Cincinnatti, los Bravos de Boston y los Filis de Filadelfia, se le puede considerar fácilmente, sin ofender a nadie, de “nada del otro mundo” ni, posiblemente, de este tampoco. Después […]

100 Years Ago Today

December 11, 2011 by · 1 Comment 

In early December 1911, Washington Nationals president Tom Noyes welcomed his new manager Clark Griffith to town for the first time.  Griffith was given a posh new office in the Southern building and no sooner had he looked over his new digs, than he was off to the winter meetings to hunt for talent during […]

His Game to Win

November 3, 2011 by · 3 Comments 

Tony LaRussa retires and Davey Johnson returns. It might seem that the trade off leaves the managerial ranks about the same, but there is a changing of the guard occurring in the leadership of Major League Baseball. LaRussa’s 33 years as manager is unequalled except by Connie Mack–whose 53 years in the dugout is one […]

BBA Names Arizona’s Gibson, Tampa Bay’s Maddon Top Managers

October 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Top Blogger Organization Awards Connie Mack Award For 2011 Arizona Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson and Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon were named the 2011 Connie Mack Award winners today by the Baseball Bloggers Alliance.  The Connie Mack Award recognizes those considered the top manager for the season. Gibson took over an Arizona team that […]

Forerunner Foster

June 2, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Long before Muhammad Ali asserted that he was the greatest, Rube Foster staked that claim for himself and his teams. Foster, author Robert Charles Cottrell says, could be considered more influential than Jackie Robinson. Read “The Best Pitcher in Baseball: The Life of Rube Foster, Negro League Giant” because: 1. Foster consistently put the best […]

Get a Glove on “Catcher”

April 28, 2011 by · 2 Comments 

Two-thousand ten was the “Year of the Pitcher.” Pitchers have almost always been paramount. But did you know there was a time when a hurler took a backseat to his backstop? Peter Morris details this post-Antebellum period in “Catcher: How the Man behind the Plate Became an American Folk Hero.” Read this book because: 1. […]

Strat: ’94 Expos Dominate Fall Classic, Sweep the ’31 A’s

February 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

The 1994 Montreal Expos will go down in history as one of the ultimate “What If?” teams after jumping out to a 74-40 record through their first 114 games, a .649 winning percentage, 105-win pace and a possible date with destiny before a work stoppage kept them from finishing what they started. Thanks to the […]

Talk about a Gathering!

January 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

We’ve all seen the photo. It’s the Baseball Hall of Fame’s Opening Day in 1939. Naturally, “The Sultan of Swat” sits in the center. Nine men, who may or may not have been Ruth’s equals but were without question baseball immortality, surround “The Babe.” “A Great Day in Cooperstown“ begins with this photo. My, oh […]

Marvelous Mack

December 2, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Connie Mack, “The Tall Tactician”, Major League Baseball’s longest-tenured manager for 50 seasons with the Philadelphia A’s, employer of the $100,000 infield. If ever you wanted to discover something about Mack or the dawn of baseball, chances are you will find it in “Connie Mack and the Early Years of Baseball“ by Norman L. Macht. […]

The Beacon of Birmingham

November 18, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

In the midst of a dark and all-too predictable world, Rickwood Field became a beacon. Birthed out of a conversation with Connie Mack, the ballpark started with a handful of rivals but outlasted each of them to stand peerless. Read Allen Barra’s “Rickwood Field: A Century in America‒s Oldest Ballpark“ because: 1. Similar to last […]

The Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic: Game Four

November 7, 2010 by · 2 Comments 

In part one of my Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic series, I featured Game One of the 1988 World Series between the Oakland A’s and Los Angeles Dodgers, won by the latter on Kirk Gibson’s walk-off two-run homer off Dennis Eckersley, ironic because it was Eck who coined the phrase “walk-off piece.”  Part two featured an […]

Black Ball, Both Real and Imaginary

August 30, 2010 by · 2 Comments 

I’ve never been a huge fan of baseball fiction. The game’s natural mythology and unforgettable luminaries since the turn of last century is so rich and entertaining by itself that I never felt a need to delve into stories and characters separate from the real ones. I did make an exception for W. P. Kinsella’s […]

Babe Ruth Homered in $800 Million Baseball Game

May 1, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

On August 26, 1943, 48-year-old Babe Ruth hit a home run off 43-year-old Walter Johnson into the right field stands at the Polo Grounds. The blast – one of the last by the Babe – was witnessed by 35,000 fans and helped raise $800 million in War Bonds. Organized by the long-since defunct New York […]

Psst… Wanna know a secret?

April 20, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

“Wanna know a secret? A lot of your heroes weren’t the men you thought they were. The reality of the game they played differs from your ideal picture too. OK, I guess that’s not really a surprise. But more often than not, histories paint romantic pictures of yesterday’s stars. Perhaps some childhood mischief or an […]

More Interesting Research Finds

March 8, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

One of the pleasures of doing research for a book or article is the discovery of interesting facts that have nothing to do with what’s being researched, but demand attention.  Here are more interesting and odd research finds that I’ve discovered over the years. Famous Last Words October 19, 1912: When Philadelphia Athletics magnate Connie […]

The Pittsburgh Americans? It Almost Happened

June 1, 2009 by · 2 Comments 

Over the first 30 years of the modern era, Barney Dreyfuss’ Pittsburgh Pirates battled John McGraw’s New York Giants for National League supremacy, but had Ban Johnson gotten his wish, the Pirates might have been the class of the American League instead. On October 11, 1899 a group of executives from the Western League, including […]