April 26, 2017

The King of Baseball

September 17, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

Hey baseball fans! As some of you know, Masahiro Tanaka won his 25th consecutive game pitched a couple days ago for the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of the Japanese professional baseball league, breaking the 75-year-old record that was held by Carl Hubbell, the Hall of Fame pitcher for the New York Giants. Some of you might be asking […]

Harvey vs. Scherzer is Like Deja Vu All Over Again

August 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Tomorrow’s bout between the New York Mets and Detroit Tigers at Citi Field would most likely be ignored outside of New York and Michigan but for the anticipated match-up of two of the game’s best pitchers—24-year-old phenom Matt Harvey and 28-year-old all-but-guaranteed-to-win-the-AL Cy Young Award, Max Scherzer.  Granted the Tigers don’t have anything clinched yet, […]

Hardly a Miracle

August 12, 2013 by · 2 Comments 

Even before the Boston Braves completed their historic comeback from a 15-game deficit on July 4 to overtake the New York Giants, win the National League pennant going away and sweep the heavily-favored Philadelphia Athletics in the 1914 World Series, manager George Stallings was being called the “Miracle Man.” After only 13 games, 10 of […]

An Interview with Billy Crystal

August 9, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Hey baseball fans! I have a really cool interview for you today. This is my first ever actor interview, and it’s someone that I am very honored to have interviewed, Billy Crystal! Before I get to the interview, let me tell you a little bit about this great actor. William Edward “Billy” Crystal was born […]

Reviewing The Baseball Hall of Shame: The Best of Blooperstown

June 13, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Let’s face it; for many of us baseball fans the game is not always about who won or lost. It’s about the story and the journey of our favorite teams and players, which are comprised of plays; the unusual, the good, the bad, and the ugly. Perhaps more than any other sport baseball has a […]

Hi Bithorn: Puerto Rico’s Baseball Pioneer

January 20, 2012 by · 2 Comments 

More than 225 players who were born in Puerto Rico have played major league baseball, representing a staggering amount for such a small country. Their successes were paved by right handed pitcher Hiram “Hi” Bithorn, who was the first of them to debut, with the Chicago Cubs in 1942. Bithorn is not well-remembered today because […]

In an Instant

November 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

What if you were known for one thing most of your life? What if that one thing was not favorable? That’s the story Ralph Branca tells in “A Moment in Time” with David Ritz. Read this book because: 1. Good or bad, baseball is one of life’s few constants. (Well, almost.) There’s nothing like the […]

Remembering Paul LaPalme

November 2, 2011 by · 1 Comment 

This past winter baseball lost one of its treasures in Paul LaPalme. He was never a star, nor did he have great accomplishments in the game, but he was a great ambassador for baseball. He passed away in February, 2010 at the age of 86, and left behind a strong connection with baseball, the game […]

Negro Leagues Database Update: American Series in Cuba, 1904-1915

October 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

In the 1900s and 1910s, with Cuba newly independent from Spain but under heavy U.S. influence (and sometimes occupation), a baseball exchange formed between the two countries.  In the summers teams of the best Cuban players toured the U.S. as the “All-Cubans” or the “Cuban Stars”; in the fall American teams traveled to Havana to […]

Gambling on the 1917 White Sox-Giants World Series

May 19, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

The recent New York Times article about speculation that the Cubs threw the 1918 World Series to the Red Sox brings up the broader issue of how deeply major league baseball was corrupted by gambling and a money culture in the 1910s. A while ago I looked up how the Chicago Tribune covered the end […]

Due To Darkness

March 25, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

The 1922 World Series featured a rematch of the previous year’s championship series between the New York Giants and New York Yankees. The series also included one of the most controversial calls in World Series history, up to that point, in game two of the series. The entire series was being held at the Polo […]

“Pitchers of Beer: The Story of the Seattle Rainiers” by Dan Raley

March 25, 2011 by · 2 Comments 

WELL-DONE HISTORY OF BYGONE SEATTLE BASEBALL ERA As someone who used to literally sit at my grandfather’s knee listening to his stories of the old Seattle Rainiers and the Pacific Coast League, I became quite familiar with names of people who built baseball in Seattle in the years from 1938 onward.  Grandpa was the head […]

“Havana Heat” by Darryl Brock

February 16, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Fans of Darryl Brock will find much to admire in his novel Havana Heat. It is very reminiscent in feel and tone to his classic If I Never Get Back and its sequel Two In the Field. There is no time traveling in this novel but it is a  travel back in time. The hero […]

Another One Bites The Dust

November 11, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

I didn’t know the late William Lee “Bill” Jennings. Never met him, never had a chat with him, never even knew of him until recently, in fact. What little I do know about Mr. Jennings, who died at the age of 85 on October 20, 2010, is attributable to his passing being prominently mentioned on […]

The Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic: Game Three

November 6, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

In part one of my Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic series, I featured Game One of the 1988 World Series between the Oakland A’s and Los Angeles Dodgers.  Part two featured an epic 14-inning battle between the Boston Red Sox and Brooklyn Robins in Game Two of the 1916 Fall Classic.  For Game Three, I’m staying […]

The Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic: Game Two

November 4, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

In part one of my Ultimate Seven-Game Fall Classic series, I featured Game One of the 1988 World Series between the Oakland A’s and Los Angeles Dodgers.  This time around, I’m traveling back to the Deadball Era when pitchers still dominated the game and runs were hard to come by.  It wasn’t until the “Roaring […]

Lazzari’s Baseball Roundup 4

September 22, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

TRIVIA QUESTION: The 1987 Cincinnati Reds–who finished 2nd in the NL West under Pete Rose–had four players who hit more than 20 home runs apiece. How many of these players can you name? Answer to follow……….I used to think that a Steve Carlton slider was a pure thing of beauty–that is, until I saw a […]

Part Three: The Story Of The 1888-1889 New York Giants

September 18, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

The 1889 World Series would be a battle of the boroughs as the National League champion, New York Giants, would look to repeat as world champions against the American Association champion, the Brooklyn Bridegrooms. As soon as the pennants in both leagues were decided, representatives from both squads sat down and laid down the ground […]

Part Two: The Story Of The 1888-1889 New York Giants

August 6, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

Every player was smiling when the New York Giants departed the bus that had brought them home from St. Louis, where they had just captured the franchise’s first World Series. Even President John Day, who was feeling the effects of a flu he’d contracted on the trip, was in a talkative mood about the series. […]

Part One: The Story Of The 1888-1889 New York Giants

July 16, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

March 8, 1888 was the day the New York Giants arrived in Jacksonville, Florida to begin preparation for the upcoming National League season. The team, entering its sixth year of play in professional baseball, was coming off an 1887 season which saw them finish 4th in the National League. There was, however, plenty of reason […]

Buying A Manager

“I came here with $100,000 to get a new manager and two new players for the Chicago club.” said Chicago Cubs President Charles H. Weeghman as he arrived in New York City for the annual National League baseball meetings of 1916. “I have in mind for a leader two men who have attained national prominence […]

Meet the New Park Factors – Part I

March 28, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

“It’s a park that could make you a hero or a bum.” – Stan Musial on the Polo Grounds, 1957 Stan Musial was truly one of the most consistently great hitters baseball has ever seen. With a lifetime average of .331, his slumps were like comets—showing up every few years, then disappearing in a flash. […]

Maple Street Press Belts One Onto Lansdowne Street

March 17, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

My buddy Matt Aber wondered aloud in his recent review of Maple Street Press’ Phillies 2010 Annual if these are the franchise’s “Golden Days,” which made me wonder if these aren’t also the Red Sox’ “Golden Days.”  Perhaps, although it’s going to be tough to top the 16-year stretch from 1903-1918 in which they won […]

The National Pastime Almanac and the Joy of Numbers

March 13, 2010 by · 5 Comments 

This time of year is my favorite for obvious reasons: Spring Training is in full swing, newsstands are peppered with baseball preview magazines, and the weather starts to warm up, allowing me to hang out in my back yard with a good book or magazine, an adult beverage, a strong cigar, and, eventually, a Red […]

The Day “Sunny Jim” Made History

February 22, 2010 by · 1 Comment 

One of the great things about going to a baseball game is you’ll never know what you will see. Perhaps you might witness a no-hitter or a triple play. Or, as was the case for roughly 8,000 fans in Brooklyn on Sept. 16, 1924, a record which has yet to be broken. Certainly there were […]

Connecticut Smoky Joe Wood SABR Chapter’s 2010 Winter Meeting

February 21, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

On Saturday, February 20, the Connecticut Smoky Joe Wood SABR Chapter held its annual winter meeting.  Over thirty Society for American Baseball Research members attended and listened to several great presentations over a five hour period. Norm Hausmann, a new SABR member and a Hartford baseball historian, briefly discussed old Bulkeley Stadium and his mission […]

The Pittsburgh Americans? It Almost Happened

June 1, 2009 by · 2 Comments 

Over the first 30 years of the modern era, Barney Dreyfuss’ Pittsburgh Pirates battled John McGraw’s New York Giants for National League supremacy, but had Ban Johnson gotten his wish, the Pirates might have been the class of the American League instead. On October 11, 1899 a group of executives from the Western League, including […]